New addition to the collection

Today I received a copy of Boyle and Charles’ Curriculum Development. For now it will have to go onto the reading pile for the summer, but a quick flick though has already shown some very useful sections which I can take forward as an undergraduate course manager and curriculum developer.

More on this at a later point.

Curriculum Development book

Boyle, B. and Charles, M. (2016) Curriculum Development. London: SAGE Publications, pp.222, ISBN 978-1-44627-330-2.

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Organised crime against the academic peer review system

organized-crime4
This is what I think about when I hear “organised crime”.

The following is an excellent read on how the academic peer-review system was abused and cheated, and how a journal editing team takes responsibility, investigates and is completely transparent.

Cohen et al. (2016) ‘Organised crime against the academic peer review system‘. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 81(6), 1012-1017. DOI: 10.1111/bcp.12992

It is a pity this happened, but by going through this route, the academic community can learn from their mistakes, and hopefully make the chance of this happening again smaller. You can never completely prevent these things from happening, because organised crime will always try to find new ways of cheating the system. However, as the authors quite rightly state, a select minority should not be allowed to make life more difficult for the well-intended majority.

Thanks to Terry McGlynn at Small Pond Science for posting about this.

I participated in HEA ResearchWebinar 10

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HEA Research Webinar 10

Due to enormous marking loads, reflection on this webinar will follow later, but I couldn’t resist highligting the supporting information, which can be found here: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/research/research-webinars

It was a very informative webinar, and the toolkit should be of use for future CPD events: I am planning to do a follow-up of the CPD session on systematic reviews for undergraduate dissertations I delivered earlier this year and this will help with evaluating.

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I feel these reflective questions are also useful for HE teaching sessions

Excellent post on writing research proposals

The 4-sentence research proposal

By Amanda Wolf Amanda Wolf is Deputy Head of the School of Government at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand Like many of us, I was taught that research starts with a research question. The more generous texts and supervisors may quietly soften that imperative with a whispered confidence that it is permissible to amend […]

via The 4-sentence research proposal — Doctoral Writing SIG

A new journey

journey-start
It will be a long one …

It’s official: from September 2016 I will once again be a doctoral student. It has been a long process, and it has taken a lot of thinking and discussion with various people (you know who you are, thanks!), but I decided to apply for a place on the Professional Doctorate (EdD) in Education at Anglia Ruskin University a while ago, wrote a preliminary research proposal and was invited for interview a few weeks after submitting it.

The interview was more like a professional discussion than an interview, and was actually a really good experience. It has given me food for thought before I start, but it has also made me more enthusiastic.

I will be investigating if and how HE course leaders in small specialist institutions use evidence as a base for their decisions, with Writtle College as a case study. I am looking forward to the new challenge, and to the new direction my career will take me in. As this project is directly linked to my role at Writtle, it should be immediately useful. Hopefully I will have some time to fully reflect on my career choices and decisions later in the year. Blog post to follow.

This summer will be spent finishing various research projects. I have one or two papers to write/resubmit before I start the EdD, so plenty to do. But before that, finish the never-ending marking… it will be over soon… it has to be…

#LTHEchat and #HEAchat with Dr Kate Cuthbert. @cuthbert_kate. New to Teaching – What makes for a successful entry into HE teaching? — #LTHEchat

Its back on the 25th May – the #HEAchat and the #LTHEchat combo! Both hashtags will be used during this discussion. We are not going all Judy Blume on you by asking what your first time was like…..but this tweet chat will focus on the new to teaching HE experience. After you’ve read Kate Cuthbert’s blog post New to teaching – […]

via #LTHEchat and #HEAchat with Dr Kate Cuthbert. @cuthbert_kate. New to Teaching – What makes for a successful entry into HE teaching? — #LTHEchat

#LTHEChat 55 : Bilingual German/English May 18th – Opening-up HE for non-traditional students, Martina Emke (@martinaemke)

#LTHEchat

#LTHEChat 55: Die Öffnung der Hochschulen für nicht-traditionelle Studierende, Martina Emke (@martinaemke)

OFFENE_HOCHSCHULE_portraits_00986 Martina Emke @martinaemke

Who are non-traditional students? According toa 2015 report by theNational Center for Education Statistics (NCSC) there is no clear definition. However, there seem to be some characteristics that many non-traditional students (NTS) share: NTS often study part-time, work full-time and have dependents. Another common factor seems to be that for many NTS the support of university staff and the institution, to help increase their confidence in learning and address practical and personal issues, is crucial for their success at university study (Field, Merrill & West, 2012).

NTS already possess professional knowledge and work experience which influence their attitude towards studying. Research suggests that they are interested in applying knowledge and that they are determined and committed to learning and studying because they have clear goals, which are often connected to pursuing a professional…

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