RCVS Knowledge Summary

RCVSKnowledge

My first Knowledge Summary for Veterinary Evidence has just been published. It is on raw feeding and periodontal health in dogs, and is the result of joint work with Matthew  Armstrong from Natures Menu.

The paper can be found here: https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/article/view/88/0

On to the next one!

 

Reporting research

vetrec-logo

I have recently published a letter to the editor in Veterinary Record regarding the use of reporting guidelines in veterinary research papers:

http://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/content/180/3/78.2.full

Hopefully this letter will lead to discussion regarding the use of reporting guidelines, and raise awareness of their importance to enabling evidence-based veterinary medicine research.

Amazon CreateSpace publishing

book_coverI have had a play around with Amazon CreateSpace self-publishing platform, using my MSc dissertation as a manuscript, and am now the proud author of a self-published book. It is available on Kindle and in hard copy in a few days. The process was pretty straight forward, so I am definitely keeping this in mind for future projects. I am not sure how much value it carries towards my academic career, but I feel self-publishing is a way of sharing information which would otherwise just gather dust.

A good post on the topic of academic self-publishing can be found here. It is worth a read, whether you agree with the concept or not. I kind of enjoyed the process of creating something new, and am happy my early research is now available to the whole world, rather than just the student who happens to come across it in the Writtle University College library.

Organised crime against the academic peer review system

organized-crime4
This is what I think about when I hear “organised crime”.

The following is an excellent read on how the academic peer-review system was abused and cheated, and how a journal editing team takes responsibility, investigates and is completely transparent.

Cohen et al. (2016) ‘Organised crime against the academic peer review system‘. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 81(6), 1012-1017. DOI:¬†10.1111/bcp.12992

It is a pity this happened, but by going through this route, the academic community can learn from their mistakes, and hopefully make the chance of this happening again smaller. You can never completely prevent these things from happening, because organised crime will always try to find new ways of cheating the system. However, as the authors quite rightly state, a select minority should not be allowed to make life more difficult for the well-intended majority.

Thanks to Terry McGlynn at Small Pond Science for posting about this.