Grounded Theory methodology symposium – UPDATED

UPDATE: My GTNetwork18 presentation can be found here.

Next week (22 November 2018) I will be presenting a paper at the inaugural Grounded Theory Network symposium at Liverpool John Moores University. The paper will focus on the justification of Glaserian grounded theory for investigating evidence-based practice by higher education course leaders. It should be a good experience, and a great general rehearsal for a manuscript I am preparing on the topic. For those interested I have made the abstract available here and the actual presentation here.

In addition to the presentation, I have also been invite to represent Glaserian grounded theory on a discussion panel and answer audience questions from my perspective. This is slightly more scary, as I am early on in my GT journey. However, it will be a good exercise and it has forced me to pick up the methodology literature again. Fingers crossed!

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Final research proposal approved!

NEWS FLASH

NEWS FLASH: My formal #ARUEdD research proposal has been approved by the university! After preparing for it for the past two years as part of phase 1 of the EdD (best thing ever!), I feel relieved and excited that it is finally there. I am actually starting EdD Stage 2. Next on the list is to get ethical approval for my project, and then it is time to start collecting data. Scary stuff! I look forward to talking to colleagues and course managers in other institutions. I am passionate about this project, because it affects me personally, and I think the outcomes may make a real difference to those in my role.

If you are interested in the project, I have added the proposal to this website. Please find it here.

Another snippet of good news: my #EBCMgt review paper with Dr Philip Howlett has been published a few days ago in International Journal of Educational Management (find it at DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-09-2017-0250). A blog post about it is on its way, and related conference material can be found here.

Poster presentation

On 26 July I will be presenting the following poster at the 12th Anglia Ruskin Annual Research Student Conference. Click on the poster to get a copy of the corresponding abstract. Alternatively, click here.

2018 PGR Conference Poster NV

Grounded Theory Seminar

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Causeway Business Centre, Petersfield

On 24 and 25 May I attended a Grounded Theory (GT) seminar in Petersfield. This seminar, led by Dr Helen Scott (Grounded Theory Online) with a surprise Skype appearance from Prof Tom Andrews (UC Cork) is aimed at doctoral researchers in all stages of their doctoral journey and intends to give researchers a platform to discuss their research, and to seek guidance from GT experts and peers.

I decided to attend this seminar as I am currently in the proposal stage for my EdD and was struggling with my understanding of the method and what it would look like in practice. Unfortunately Glaser’s approach of “Just do it” (no swoosh here, Glaser coined the term before a big sports clothing company did) is not the most helpful when you are trying to write a proposal as not only a novice GT researcher, but also a novice qualitative researcher.

I set of on my journey early on the 24th, and soon realised the M25 is a pig! After 3.5 hours I finally arrived in Petersfield, in a very nice business centre in what appeared to be a grade-listed building. After a friendly welcome and some much needed coffee, the seminar was underway. It was a small group, with seven researcher from various fields (urban transport, nursing, psychotherapy, business management, policing, ICT and education management) in various stages of their research (range: proposal writing stage – thesis writing-up stage).

Day 1 started with an overview and discussion of the GT research process. Although all of us were familiar with classic Grounded Theory, it was good to see that there was plenty of discussion on various details of the process, such as the purposes of properties, dimensions and degrees of a concepts, and how this affects GT research practice. Importantly, the discussions did not only address theory, but there was plently of talk about practice and GT in real life (real life is messy, but GT can cope with that).

After this, it was my turn to present my project, where I am in my journey and what I am struggling with. Although I had given this some though on the way in (plenty of time to think when you’re stuck in traffic), it was hard to put my concerns into coherent words. I am still not sure why, but I think it had something to do with being around people who were further on in the journey, and I am still getting used to the GT language. Confidence is a weird thing. However, I managed to talk through my project with Helen, and received some great peer-input from the rest of the group. This is what I think was the best aspect of the seminar: talking stuff through with other doctoral GT researchers, and hearing their experiences, woes and worries. As a result, I am now much more confident, and felt able to contribute to further discussions.

After a lovely lunch in a very nice garden, we discussed three more GT projects, during which everyone contributed and some lively discussions were had. It was now time to go to my hotel and have some dinner. I was fortunate in that two other seminar attendees stayed in the same hotel. We ended up having a great discussion over dinner and a few beers, evaluating the day and discussing our research. With my mind buzzing with research ideas and my brain turned to mush I went to bed.

Day 2 started with a brief recap from day 1, after which we went on to discuss another 3 grounded theory projects. Valuable discussions were held, and I felt much more able and confident to contribute to discussions and ask probing questions. My role as a lecturer came in handy as I could provide one attendee who was an MRes student with some advice. After another lovely lunch, we switched to practicing coding and memoing from an interview transcript provided by Helen. As a group I think we did a decent job, and again I felt confident I could make a valuable contribution. It turns out Glaser is right: you do really learn GT bu doing it. After a bit of an uncertain start, I got the hang of it and now understand coding a lot better. towards the end of the exercise, Helen shared with us her codes for the interview, and it was quite remarkable how similar our codes were; grounded theory is a powerful method!

We ended the day with a surprise Skype visit from Professor Tom Andrews, who shared with us his take on grounded theory. Tom was unfased by the technical difficulties we experienced and patiently answered our questions. It was really useful to hear from another GT expert, and hearing him confirm much of what we heard over the past two days. I now have Tom’s most recent paper on GT which I look forward to reading and incorporating it in my final #ARUEdD paper.

Overall, the grounded theory seminar has been a great experience. I have learned a lot, and feel much more confident that I will not make as much silly mistakes in my research as I would have done if I had not had this experience. I will most likely return in a year or two to get more assistance. I would wholeheartedly recommend the GT seminar to everyone considering or undertaking classic grounded theory research. Apart from the subject matter, it was incredibly valuable to discuss my work and woes with others doing similar research, and to simply network with like-minded researchers. We now have a Grounded Theory WhatsApp group, and it is going to be good to stay in touch!

If you are interested in a grounded theory seminar, or in grounded theory as a research method, please have a look here. I have no affiliation with Grounded Theory Online, but they are very helpful!

 

 

EdD progress update

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Picture © 2016 Themely.com

I realise it has been a while since the last post, and a lot of things have happened in the day job, but also the EdD journey I am on. Specifically, since starting the EdD at Anglia Ruskin University in September 2016, I have successfully passed 3 out of 4 written papers, with the 4th one due in June this year. The first two papers have resulted in journal publications (paper 1 here, paper 2 is currently in press at IJEM), a conference abstract based on paper 2 has been accepted (find it here) and I have been allocated a place at the 2-day Grounded Theory Seminar in Petersfield in May.

The next steps are to finish paper 4, which is the formal research proposal, followed by submitting my application for research ethics approval. After this, the real fun starts (positive thinking here…) in the form of data collection through interviews with course leaders. Additionally, I want to investigate whether paper 3 can be turned into a published paper on application of Glaserian Grounded Theory to investigate HE course leader experiences.

I look forward to the rest of the journey. So far the EdD has been a great experience, with brilliant support from staff from the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education (you know who you are!) and very helpful discussions with the other people in my EdD cohort.

Upwards and onwards!

Letting go of my comfortable bioscience identity

identity

It has been a while since posting, and this post has been brewing in the back of my mind for a while.

I have now entered the second year of my EdD at Anglia Ruskin University. I have passed two of four assessed papers, and have been lucky enough to have the first one published and the second one accepted for publication pending minor revisions. I’m still not quite sure how that happened.

I have now reached the stage where I have to “properly” start thinking about my research, the methodology and methods I plan to use, and offer some sort of justification for them. This is immensely daunting, and I am still on a very steep learning curve when it comes to social science research, paradigms, ontologies, axiologies and all the other “-ologies” associated with qualitative research. It is scary to think I am supposed to go into stage 2 at the end of September…

On the drive to work yesterday, and again today, I was mulling this position over. It is an odd realisation that I am experiencing feelings of accomplishment in my bioscience “day-job” while at the same time feel like a complete impostor when it comes to my EdD. Someone will soon find out I don’t know what I am talking about, right..? How do I reconcile these feelings, and how do I make sure they stay balanced?

I have been thinking about ways of conquering these feelings of inadequacy, and last night I woke up with a light-bulb moment: perhaps it is time to let go of the comfort-blanket offered by my professional identity as a bioscientist, and create a new blanket instead. I am supposed to transition to becoming this hybrid bioscience-education management practictioner-researcher with feet comfortably in two fields. There will probably always be tensions between the two identities, but they should be able to co-exist and each be called upon when required. Creating the new blanket is the process of doing the EdD, and the actual finished product will be the completion of this project in a few year time. I am ok with this.

This timeline also means it is ok to be insecure and uncomfortable for a while. I have been lucky enough that I have landed in a very supportive cohort of EdD students, and have met some great academic staff that are willing and able to advise where necessary. Last but not least, there is the brilliant Twitter EdD community for support. There are some excellent bloggers and tweeters out there doing EdDs who are struggling with similar issues to mine, and together we will get there! #EdD #ARUEdD to the rescue!

Upwards and onwards. Time to start writing about my research approach. Time to get my head around Grounded Theory. Time to keep up with #AcWriMo.

EdD – workshop weekend 1

This weekend I took part in the first workshops of the Doctorate in Education (EdD) which I have started at the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education at Anglia Ruskin University. Friday night was predominantly an education to the programme, and today (Saturday) was the first ‘proper’ workshop. As it is a professional doctorate, the programme starts with a cohort phase. My 2016 cohort consist of a group of 7 including me, with a wide variety of backgrounds and previous qualifications.

The first session revolved around the concept of educational research: What is is? Who does it? Why is it done? and What are some of the issues around it? Due to the wide range of backgrounds in the group, this led to an interesting discussion on what the goal of educational research is, and we came up with a fairly lengthy definition with some extra features.

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Outcome of the discussion of what educational research is. Copyright ARU EdD cohort of 2016.

The second session addressed what it means to be (a) professional. This was a difficult concept, mainly because the term professional, and the associated term professionalism, had different meanings for people in the group. However, we all came to a consensus that professionalism is the more encompassing set of behaviours, values and actions which one needs to display in order to be a professional. On the other hand, what makes a professional was not as easily defined. In order to investigate this further we were asked to produce a short autobiographical piece on how we have developed as professionals to date, followed by more discussion. This made me realise I have come quite far in a fairly short period, and that I have made some unconscious decisions which led to where I am now.

Today has been an intense, but enjoyable day, and I feel I have made the right decision enrolling on the EdD. I look forward to the next workshop weekend, and have some good ideas for the first formative report in preparation of that weekend.Lots to think about, and a massive chunk of reading to do, but I look forward to exploring my own professional practice more over the next few weeks.